High-Assurance Base64

Author: David Lazar Galois’ mission is improving the trustworthiness of critical systems. Trustworthiness is an inherent property of a system, but we need to produce evidence of its trustworthiness in order for people to make informed decisions. The evidence, and its presentation is a key part of what is often called an assurance case. The […]

Read More

11+ Years of Formal Methods at Galois

A month or so ago, I  gave talks at SRI and NASA Ames on 11+ Years of Formal Methods at Galois (pdf).  Though I haven’t been around the whole time, it was fun to reminisce on the projects I’ve helped with and to highlight my colleagues’ work!

Read More

Tech Talk: A Multi-Encoding Approach for LTL Symbolic Satisfiability Checking

Galois is pleased to host the following tech talk.These talks are open to the interested public. Please join us!Please note that this talk is on Wednesday! title:A Multi-Encoding Approach for LTL Symbolic Satisfiability Checking speakers:Kristin Rozier time:10 August 2011, Wednesday, 10:30 A.M. location:Galois, Inc.421 SW 6th AveSte 300Portland, OR 97204(3rd floor of the Commonwealth building)  […]

Read More

Tech talk: Combining Denotational and Operational Semantics for Scalable Proof Development

Galois is pleased to host the following tech talk. These talks are open to the interested public. Please join us! title:Combining Denotational and Operational Semantics for Scalable Proof Development speakers:Adam Foltzer time:Tuesday, 19 July 2011, 10:30am location: Galois Inc. 421 SW 6th Ave. Suite 300, Portland, OR, USA (3rd floor of the Commonwealth building) abstract:Interpreters […]

Read More

ZUC in Cryptol

ZUC is a stream cipher that is proposed for inclusion in the “4G” mobile standard named LTE (Long Term Evolution), the future of secure GSM. The proposal is actually comprised several different algorithms: A stream cipher named ZUC, LTEencryption algorithm (128-EEA3), based on ZUC, LTEintegrity algorithm (128-EIA3), which is a hash function using ZUC as […]

Read More

Formally Verified Chess Endgames

On May 10 Joe Hurd gave a guest lecture at Portland State University, as part of Bart Massey‘s Computer Science course on Combinatorial Games. The topic of the guest lecture was “Formally Verified Endgame Tables”, and Joe showed how Formal Methods can be used to prove that endgame tables used by computer chess programs are […]

Read More

Merging SMT solvers and programming languages

Galois is in the business of building trustworthy software. Such software will have well-defined behavior, and that behavior is assured in some way, whether via model checking, testing, or formal verification. SMT solvers — extensions to SAT solvers with support for variables of non-boolean type — offer powerful automation for solving a variety of assurance […]

Read More

Tech talk: Formal Methods Applied to Control Software

Galois is pleased to host the following tech talk. These talks are open to the interested public. Please join us!

title:
Formal Methods Applied to Control Software
speaker:
Alwyn Goodloe
time:
10:30am, Tuesday, 16 November 2010
location:
Galois Inc.421 SW 6th Ave. Suite 300, Portland, OR, USA(3rd floor of the Commonwealth building)
abstract:
Critical cyber-physical systems, such as avionics, typically have one or more components that control the behavior of dynamical physical systems. The design of such control systems is well understood with mature and sophisticated foundations, but control engineers typically only work on Matlab/Simulink models, ignoring the implementation all together. I will speak about an ongoing collaboration with Prof. Eric Feron of Georgia Tech aimed at narrowing this gap. I will briefly describe the design of a Matlab to C translator being written in Haskell and verified using the Frama-C tool and the Prototype Verification System (PVS). In addition, I will give a survey of our efforts in enhancing PVS’ capabilities in this area by building a Linear Algebra library targeted at the math used by control engineers.
bio:
Alwyn Goodloe obtained his B.Sc. in Computer Science from Old Dominion University in 1985 and an M.Sc. in Mathematics from George Mason University in 1992. He worked for fourteen years in the software industry as a software engineer, database administrator, Unix system administrator, and technologist. In 1999, he returned to graduate school to study at the University of Pennsylvania, where he obtained a Ph.D. in Computer and Information Science in 2008. At Penn he conducted research in the area of computer and network security. He is currently a research scientist at the National Institute of Aerospace in Hampton, Virginia. At NIA his research focus has been formal methods applied to high-reliable systems such as avionics.
Read More

Tech Talk: Copilot: A Hard Real-Time Runtime Monitor

Galois is pleased to host the following tech talk. These talks are open to the interested public. Please join us!

title:
Copilot: A Hard Real-Time Runtime Monitor (slides, video)
speaker:
Lee Pike
time:
10:30am, Tuesday, 9 November 2010
location:
Galois Inc.421 SW 6th Ave. Suite 300, Portland, OR, USA(3rd floor of the Commonwealth building)
abstract:
We address the problem of runtime monitoring for hard real-time programs—a domain in which correctness is critical yet has largely been overlooked in the runtime monitoring community. We describe the challenges to runtime monitoring for this domain as well as an approach to satisfy the challenges. The core of our approach is a language and compiler called Copilot. Copilot is a stream-based dataflow language that generates small constant-time and constant-space C programs, implementing embedded monitors. Copilot also generates its own scheduler, obviating the need for an underlying real-time operating system. This talk will include fun pictures and videos.
bio:
Lee Pike has worked in Research & Development at Galois, Inc. since 2005. His primary area of research is dependable embedded systems, including both safety-critical and security-critical systems. Previously, he was a research scientist with the NASA Langley Formal Methods Group. He has a Ph.D in Computer Science from Indiana University. He has a Best Paper award from Formal Methods in Computer-Aided Design (FMCAD’2007), and service includes being on the program committees of FMCAD and Interactive Theorem Proving. His publications and other information can be found at http://www.cs.indiana.edu/~lepike.
Read More